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Census image

There’s Still Time to Participate in the US Census

Census imageCensus taking for 2020 ends on September 30th, and it’s vitally important that communities report their numbers as accurately as possible.

Why is counting community members important? Because census data is used to allocate resources, pay for community services and even determine how many representatives are elected to Congress. The U.S. Constitution mandates that the country count its population once every 10 years. The results are used to adjust or redraw electoral districts, based on where populations have increased or decreased. These results will impact communities for the next decade.

So if you haven’t gotten around to it, take the easiest step you can take to help your community and fill out the census form. Your answers are completely confidential, whether you give them to a live census taker, send in a written form or do it all online from the comfort of your home. Today is a great day to stand up (or sit down) and be counted!

Climate Change Will Be On Voters’ Minds Come November

Climate Change ProtestersThe number of Americans who feel passionately about climate change is rising sharply, and the issue appears likely to play a more important role in this year’s election than ever before, a new survey shows.

What’s more, despite the turmoil caused by overlapping national and global crises, support for action to curb climate change has not diminished. Backing for government to do more to deal with global warming, at 68 percent in May of 2018, was at the same level in 2020, according to the survey, issued Monday.

Many social scientists might have predicted a different result. A hypothesis in psychology called the “finite pool of worry” suggests that when people’s level of concern about one issue rises, concern about others tends to fall. Climate change, under such thinking, appeared to be a “luxury good” issue, the sort of thing that’s nice to have if you can afford it, but which gets pushed down the list of priorities in tough times.

The survey, the latest in a 23-year series, suggests that, instead, climate change has become important enough to Americans that it remains prominent despite the global coronavirus pandemic, with its rising death count in the United States, as well as the related national economic crisis, the pressures of self isolation brought on by the pandemic and a never-ending rush of other news.

You can read more on the NY Times website here.

You can also test your climate emissions knowledge with this short quiz, also from the NY Times. It’s trickier than you might think!

Ravenswood Plant

From Polluting Peakers to Publicly-Owned Solar: Is This the Future?

Ravenswood PlantWestern Queens is the home of the Ravenswood Generating Station, the country’s 23rd largest power plant. Its gas-powered turbines consume millions of cubic feet of natural gas creating steam and steam-powered electricity. As a peaker plant, it is only supposed to come online a few times a year when electricity demand exceeds the capacity of normal plants, but with the increase in the numbers of visitors and residents to NYC in recent years, they have been needed more and more, especially in the evening hours when so many computers, televisions and other electronic devices are being used. And it is now known that the pollution they cause can create severe adverse health effects for the people who live in close proximity to them.

The impact of peaker plants on air quality, and contributing to respiratory illness, has left residents of the Bronx, Queens, and Brooklyn living in the vicinity of these plants more susceptible to COVID-19, which has disproportionately impacted people of color in low-income areas. Living with long-term air pollution is deemed “a threat multiplier,” drastically impacting health outcomes, which also point to the disproportionately higher rates of COVID-19. Residents of the South Bronx, Western Queens, and Sunset Park in Brooklyn in particular have suffered the most from the siting of the city’s peaker plants.

And now solar power is being proposed as a way to mitigate the costs, both financial and human, of peaker plants.

In Sunset Park, Solar One’s Here Comes Solar team is providing technical training for community members as a partner to UPROSE, who are leading the construction of Sunset Park Solar, one of the nation’s first — and New York’s first — cooperatively-owned community solar project, on top of the Brooklyn Army Terminal.

Community member subscribers to Sunset Park Solar will also be members of the New York City Community Energy Cooperative, and engage in decision-making meetings where they can vote and have a say in the future of the project.

Community organizations across the city are looking at Sunset Park Solar as a potential model for how community solar programs can work with city agencies and multiple types of partners.

You can read more about this on Gothamist.com here.

Celebrate Pride!

At Solar One, we are proud of our LGBTQI employees, partners, supporters, colleagues and friends.

 

Happy Pride Everyone. 

 

For more information on virtual events, participation and history, visit NYC Pride.

 

Juneteenth image

Celebrate Juneteenth with Free Online Events & Celebrations

Juneteenth imageAbraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, which marked the final chapter of legalized human slavery in the United States. But down in Texas, no one was in a hurry to tell the 250,000 enslaved people there that they were free. They had to endure another two and a half years of forced servitude before General Gordon Granger read the Proclamation declaring them free on June 19, 1865 in Galveston.

Ever since, African Americans in Texas have celebrated Juneteenth as an alternative Independence Day, and the celebrations have now spread across Black America so that what was once confined to communities in Texas is now celebrated everywhere.

Tomorrow is a sobering Juneteenth. We are still in the midst of a global pandemic that has affected families of color disproportionately, and are also grappling with wave after wave of violence against Black people, a reminder that we still have a long way to go before we are all truly free. Even as protests have swept the nation and reforms to police departments are being seriously discussed in many communities, African Americans and other people of color continue to be subject to violence and discrimination based on the color of their skin.

We at Solar One want wish you a good and meaningful Juneteenth. Here are some events that you can join to commemorate Juneteenth from the comfort of your home.

Juneteenth Music Festival: Great lineup of hosts, DJs and love performers. Free global livestreaming event that runs all day on Thursday, into the night. https://www.juneteenthmusicfestival.com/

Carnegie Hall is livestreaming a speech/sermon by Rev. Dr. James A. Forbes Jr. of Riverside Church on Friday at 7:30pm: https://www.carnegiehall.org/Calendar/2020/06/19/Live-with-Carnegie-Hall-Juneteenth-Celebration-0730PM

Juneteenth Jubilee: A Night of Black Joy and Activism: A celebration with comedians, DJs, frontline organizers and more. Friday night starting at 7pm. Tickets are $5-20: https://www.caveat.nyc/event/juneteenth-jubilee-a-night-of-black-joy-and-activism-6-19-2020

Groundswell is hosting “Prepare for Power”, an evening with speeches from environmental justice activists/leaders and a live musical performance by Bartees Strange on Friday at 6pm: https://groundswell.org/prepareforpower/

Juneteenth Virtual Block Party hosted by the Coalition for Educational Justice on Friday at 12pm: www.eventbrite.com/e/juneteenth-action-virtual-block-party-tickets-109210601850

NYC Men Teach Virtual Juneteenth Education is Freedom program, Friday 4:15pm (teach-in) followed by a program from 5-7pm: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/nycmt-showcase-education-is-freedom-celebrating-liberatory-pedagogy-tickets-104976597830

 Celebrating Juneteenth, Centre for Social Innovation, a musical performance and dialogue with Malik Work. Please note that this event is intended exclusively for Black People. Friday, 3-4pm: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/celebrating-juneteenth-tickets-109699494140

The History of Juneteenth and Systemic Racism and Solutions, a discussion between Dr. James C. Anyike, Lead Servant/Pastor of Scott United Methodist Church and Tammy L. Cooper, Black History Educator and College Professor. Friday 12-1pm: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-history-of-juneteenth-and-systemic-racism-solutions-tickets-109006354942

May your celebrations give you joy and strength!

SOLAR ONE’S STATEMENT ON THE MURDER OF GEORGE FLOYD AND ITS IMPACT ON OUR COMMUNITY

June 4, 2020

George Floyd, an unarmed Black man, was brutally murdered by the police in Minneapolis. Solar One mourns his death, and expresses sorrow for his family, loved ones, and everyone else who is impacted by this tragedy. We also mourn the deaths of Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner, Sandra Bland, Michael Brown, Tony McDade and countless others. We are all affected by acts of violence that desecrate the value of human life. Unfortunately, police violence against Black people, and people of color, is not new. Tragedies like this one remind us that we have a long way to go to realize the ideals of liberty and justice for all.

Solar One stands in solidarity with demonstrators calling for criminal justice reform and greater police accountability to the communities they serve, particularly Black, Indigenous and People of Color communities. We stand with our staff, friends, and neighbors whose diversity make us stronger and make us who we are as New Yorkers. We call upon our leaders to take last week’s tragedy, and the demonstrations that have followed, to advance the cause of justice through policies that address institutional and systemic societal racism.

We at Solar One believe that all New Yorkers play a meaningful role in efforts to protect the environment and to build a more sustainable and resilient City for future generations. The murder of George Floyd is a symptom of the same callousness and institutional racism that allows polluting industries to site facilities in communities of color, and that allows underinvestment in education and housing in these same communities. Solar One seeks to honor George Floyd’s memory by dedicating ourselves to racial justice as our environmental programs continue to evolve to meet community needs in these challenging times.

-Staff and Board of Solar One

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