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S1 BLOG

Study Finds Link Between Wildfire Smoke and Covid Risk

In a new study published on Friday, a team of researchers at Harvard University found evidence that exposure to elevated levels of fine particle pollution found in wildfire smoke may have led to thousands more cases of covid-19 and more deaths among those who tested positive for the coronavirus.

In some counties in California and Washington state hit particularly hard by wildfires last year, the study, published in the journal Science Advances, concluded that nearly 20 percent of the covid-19 cases were linked to elevated levels of wildfire smoke. The researchers also found that an even higher percentage of deaths could be linked to wildfire smoke in certain counties.

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Latest IPCC Report: Time Is Running Out

Across the country and across the globe, the effects human industrial development has had on our planet have become impossible to ignore. Record-breaking heat waves, wildfires and floods have been wreaking havoc with a humanity that is still grappling with a global viral pandemic. The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) makes clear: We’re running out of time to forestall not all but possibly the worst projected climate outcomes.

It’s difficult to impossible not to feel a sense of frustration, when considering that the IPCC has been trying to prod global action to protect the environment from the most dire effects of man-made climate change since 1988. That’s 33 years of “C’mon, people! Don’t you think we ought to consider, you know, doing something to address this?” directly to global leaders. And yet greenhouse gas emissions are still increasing, with China and the U.S. as the biggest offenders.

This way, for certain, lies madness. And now more than ever, Solar One is committed to strengthening our programming and carrying out our mission, as an integral part of the community that has been working for decades to address the climate catastrophe.

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Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill Acknowledges the Need for Climate Action

The bipartisan infrastructure deal struck this week provides new money for climate resilience unmatched in United States history: Tens of billions of dollars to protect against floods, reduce damage from wildfires, develop new sources of drinking water in areas plagued by drought, and even relocate entire communities away from vulnerable places.

But the bill is remarkable for another reason. For the first time, both parties have acknowledged — by their actions, if not their words — that the United States is unprepared for the worsening effects of climate change and requires an enormous and urgent infusion of money and effort to get ready.

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Tokyo’s Hot Olympic Summer

No sport can escape the impacts of a changing climate. Less snow and ice, higher temperatures, and extreme weather events such as storms and heatwaves, all affect competitors and spectators alike.

“Climate change is one of the biggest challenges humanity has ever faced, affecting sport alongside so many other human activities,” says Marie Sallois, IOC Director for Corporate and Sustainable Development.

“Sporting events must constantly adapt to the impacts of climate disruption, and the Olympic Games are no exception. As a global event with a huge visibility, the Games also carry the responsibility to take effective action to address it.”

Committed to a more sustainable future, the Olympic Movement has already taken significant steps to reduce its own footprint and contribute to a climate-friendly society. Both Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 and Beijing 2022 are aiming to be carbon neutral.

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West Coast Wildfire Smoke Spreads All the Way to NYC

Wildfire smoke from Canada and the Western United States stretched across the continent this week, covering skies in a thick haze and triggering health alerts from Toronto to Philadelphia. Air quality remained in the unhealthy range across much of the East Coast on Wednesday morning as the haze pushed southward.

In recent weeks, a series of near-relentless heat waves and deepening drought linked to climate change have helped to fuel exploding wildfires. In southern Oregon, the Bootleg Fire grew so large and hot that it created its own weather, triggering lightning and releasing enormous amounts of smoke. But more than 80 large fires are currently burning across 13 American states, and many more are active across Canada.

Now, the effects are being felt thousands of miles from the flames.

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